Golden-winged Warbler Working Group

Projects

Photo: Golden-winged Warbler researchers setup capture equipment in Honduras. Ruth Bennett

Outreach on West Virginia's Private Lands

A team visits a landowner in West Virginia to consult on a potential WLFW GWWA project. Photo: Liz Brewe

A team visits a landowner in West Virginia to consult on a potential WLFW GWWA project. Photo: Liz Brewer

Golden-winged Warblers thrive in dynamic forested landscapes that are a composition of mature forest and young, shrubby habitat such as found in regenerative clearcuts and boggy wetlands. Working with private landowners to create and maintain enough young forest habitat across the landscape is crucial to help recover declining Golden-winged Warbler populations. In West Virginia, 88% of the state’s 12 million acres of forest are privately owned. The scale of outreach needed to inspire enthusiasm for young forests could be a full-time job in West Virginia and, in fact, that was exactly what several partners decided the state needed.… 

Golden-winged Warbler Adult Annual Survival Research Collaborative

A Nano-tagged female Golden-winged Warbler carefully held in a hand.Photo: Emily Filiberti
A Nano-tagged female Golden-winged Warbler.
Photo: Emily Filiberti

This collaborative effort aims to develop an integrated population model (IPM) for assessing the population viability and current and future breeding distribution of the Golden-winged Warbler using the latest advances in wildlife tracking technology. Traditional mark-recapture methods have proved insufficient for determining adult female survival – females are more difficult to recapture and detect in the field than male counterparts. Biologists across the Golden-winged Warbler breeding range are deploying VHF-radio tags to find the first reliable estimates of female Golden-winged Warbler survival…