Golden-winged Warbler Working Group

About the Working Group

Established in 2003, the Golden-winged Warbler Working Group is comprised of over 200 United States, Canadian, and Latin American ornithologists, conservationists, and land managers from academia, federal and state agencies, international non-governmental organizations, and industry biologists devoted to ensuring healthy Golden-winged Warbler populations into the future.

A female Golden-winged Warbler searches for insects in a bamboo-like plant somewhere in Central America. Photo Ruth Bennett

Welcome to Our Community

The Golden-winged Warbler Working Group is committed to fostering an inclusive and diverse community of individuals working together to conserve and manage for Golden-winged Warbler. We are committed to creating a welcoming and supportive environment for all members, regardless of race, ethnicity, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, age, religion, ability, or any other aspect of identity. We recognize the importance of international partnerships for the conservation of migratory species such as the Golden-winged Warbler. As such, we are committed to building and maintaining partnerships with organizations and individuals from a variety of cultural, linguistic, and national backgrounds to ensure that all perspectives are represented in our conservation efforts.

Working Group Objectives

Conservation Without Borders

Increase awareness of Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) conservation status throughout its range.

Coordinate Research

Identify gaps in knowledge and develop priorities for coordinated Golden-winged Warbler research and management.

Develop Conservation Tools

Develop and implement a conservation plan for Golden-winged Warblers that includes research, education, management, regional coordination, and monitoring.

Communicate Science

Develop mechanisms for information sharing and conservation action follow-through.

Learn about the working group's committees!

A biologist carefully extracts a Golden-winged Warbler from a mist-net in Nicaragua. Photo: Ruth Bennett
A biologist carefully extracts a Golden-winged Warbler from a mist-net in Nicaragua. Photo: Ruth Bennett
A group of technicians learn Golden-winged Warbler census techniques in northern New York. Photo: Sara Barker
A group of technicians learn Golden-winged Warbler survey techniques in northern New York. Photo: Sara Barker